nychealth

nychealth:

National Latino AIDS Awareness Day is October 15th!

Did you know that in 2012, 1 in 3 new HIV cases in NYC was among Latinos?

National Latino AIDS Awareness Day is a national effort to increase HIV testing awareness among the second largest impacted population. This year’s theme is “Commit to Act.” All New Yorkers are encouraged to learn their HIV status by taking a test and learning more about HIV prevention, both of which can save lives. 

To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:

Get Tested – Call 311, visit 311 online or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites.

Get Treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. For help finding care or support services in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.

Get Educated and Stay Safe – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS. Did you know there are medications available to help prevent HIV? Visit NYC Health’s PrEP and PEP page to get more info.

Find out where you can pick up free NYC Condoms.

_________________________________________________________

¡El 15 de octubre es el Día Nacional Latino para la Concientización del SIDA!

¿Sabías que, en el 2012, 1 de cada 3 neoyorquinos diagnosticados con VIH fue hispano?

El Día Nacional Latino para la Concientización del SIDA es un esfuerzo nacional para crear conciencia sobre la prueba del VIH entre la segunda población más afectada. El tema de este año es “Comprometerse a actuar.” Se insta a todos los neoyorquinos a que salven vidas al hacerse la prueba del VIH para conocer su estado y al aprender más sobre cómo prevenir el VIH.

Para evitar la transmisión del VIH en la Ciudad de Nueva York, recuerda:

Hazte la prueba – Llama al 311, visita la página web de la línea 311 o envía la palabra ‘testNYC' por mensaje de texto a 877-877 para ubicar lugares que ofrecen la prueba del VIH.

Obtén tratamiento - Si tienes VIH o conoces a alguien que tiene VIH, obtén atención médica. Para encontrar servicios médicos o asistencia de apoyo en la Ciudad de Nueva York, envía la palabra ‘CARE’ por mensaje de texto al 877-877.

Edúcate y mantente seguro – Obtén información sobre el VIH y el SIDA. ¿Sabes que existen medicamentos para ayudar a prevenir el VIH? Visita la página web de PrEP y PEP de NYC Health para obtener más información.

Averigua dónde puedes obtener los condones NYC Condoms gratis.

blackmagicalgirlmisandry
static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]
petticoatruler:

don’t
expect them to be able to go out on a whim
expect them to have lives just like yours
expect them to always be available
demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
tell other people about their illness(es)
suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.
do
understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
be supportive and understand their limitations
ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
remember that they are a person, not an illness
listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say
I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]

petticoatruler:

don’t

  • expect them to be able to go out on a whim
  • expect them to have lives just like yours
  • expect them to always be available
  • demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
  • offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
  • act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
  • challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
  • baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
  • tell other people about their illness(es)
  • suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
  • Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
  • ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.

do

  • understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
  • be supportive and understand their limitations
  • ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
  • ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
  • tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
  • remember that they are a person, not an illness
  • listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say

I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

Today, October 15 is National Latino AIDS Awareness Day #NLAAD

Why do we need this? Well, Latinos represent 17% of the U.S. population, and remain one of the populations hardest hit by HIV in the U.S. — accounting for 21% of new HIV infections.

Latinos also fare poorly along the various steps of the “treatment cascade:” While a relatively healthy 80.3% of those diagnosed with HIV are promptly linked to care only about  36.9% achieve a fully suppressed viral load.

Get involved. Get Tested. Get Support.