blackmagicalgirlmisandry
bensbardom:

queerembraces:

David Wojnarowicz wore this jacket in 1988, just 4 years before he’d ultimately die from AIDS. Sadly, just a few years ago some of his artistic work was censored at the Smithsonian. People in power are still content to try and erase his history and the continued struggles of people with AIDS

everyone everywhere please please please reblog this important artist. 

bensbardom:

queerembraces:

David Wojnarowicz wore this jacket in 1988, just 4 years before he’d ultimately die from AIDS. Sadly, just a few years ago some of his artistic work was censored at the Smithsonian. People in power are still content to try and erase his history and the continued struggles of people with AIDS

everyone everywhere please please please reblog this important artist. 

The Next Frontier? ACT UP Is Now Petitioning the U.S. Senate to Start Price Negotiations For Hep C Cures With Big PharmaThe New York chapter of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power recently sent a letter to the U.S. Senate Finance Committee to negotiate with Gilead Sciences to establish a lower — 90% lower — price for Sovaldi (sofosbuvir), the company’s new life-changing new cure for the hepatitis C virus.Currently, the drug costs about $1,000 per pill, or nearly $84,000 for a full course of treatment and has made the pharmaceutical giant nearly $5.8 billion since the beginning of this year.
Now, what do you think would happen if somebody came out with a cure for HIV?

The Next Frontier? ACT UP Is Now Petitioning the U.S. Senate to Start Price Negotiations For Hep C Cures With Big Pharma

The New York chapter of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power recently sent a letter to the U.S. Senate Finance Committee to negotiate with Gilead Sciences to establish a lower — 90% lower — price for Sovaldi (sofosbuvir), the company’s new life-changing new cure for the hepatitis C virus.

Currently, the drug costs about $1,000 per pill, or nearly $84,000 for a full course of treatment and has made the pharmaceutical giant nearly $5.8 billion since the beginning of this year.

Now, what do you think would happen if somebody came out with a cure for HIV?

Nothing Without Us

Twenty years, two continents, three generations of women and an entire untold history. That’s the premise of Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End AIDS, a new documentary in the making that’s about the female perspective of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Harriet Hirshorn, director and co-producer of the film and Rolake Odetoyinbo—a Nigerian treatment access and women’s rights activist, as well as one of four main voices in the film—give POZ magazine an in-depth look at their project.

Gay Shamelessness, Beyond the Crystal Meth Crisis

Thom Gunn, the greatest gay poet since Whitman, was one of thousands of urban gay men who fell victim to crystal methamphetamine in 2004. They were a minority only, but the drug’s Leviathon-like addictiveness could swallow a man whole.

Every few weeks brought news or rumors of someone else who “fell down the meth hole”—an exemplary longtime AIDS survivor, a famous AIDS doctor, the most-lusted-after young man in the old days of ACT UP. The gay leadership spoke of meth as “a second epidemic.”

25 Years Ago: ACT UP’s AIDS Treatment Research Agenda

"When the Fifth International AIDS Conference closed in Montreal, AIDS activism changed forever. The white coats — the medical establishment that controlled our destinies — realized they could no longer ignore us. People living with HIV and their fellow advocates pushed their way into the conference (literally, during the opening ceremony), armed with a sophisticated analysis of the sorry state of AIDS treatment research.”

-Peter Staley