HIV Criminalization 101By Sean StrubOver the last several years, as I’ve talked to a wider circle of advocates, people with HIV and policy leaders about HIV criminalization, it has become apparent to me that many people are not well-informed on the topic. 
Many people instinctively favor prosecuting people with HIV for not disclosing their HIV status prior to intimate contact — but these opinions tend to evolve quickly as a person learns more about the issue.
Nothing drives stigma more powerfully than when a government sanctions it through the enshrinement of discriminatory practices in the law or its application. That is what has happened with HIV, resulting in the creation of a viral underclass of persons with rights inferior to others, especially in regard to their sexual expression. (Read More)

HIV Criminalization 101
By Sean Strub

Over the last several years, as I’ve talked to a wider circle of advocates, people with HIV and policy leaders about HIV criminalization, it has become apparent to me that many people are not well-informed on the topic. 

Many people instinctively favor prosecuting people with HIV for not disclosing their HIV status prior to intimate contact — but these opinions tend to evolve quickly as a person learns more about the issue.

Nothing drives stigma more powerfully than when a government sanctions it through the enshrinement of discriminatory practices in the law or its application. That is what has happened with HIV, resulting in the creation of a viral underclass of persons with rights inferior to others, especially in regard to their sexual expression. (Read More)

Today is picture day! What does #adaywithHIV look like to you?

The AIDS Grove Just Renamed Its Youth Scholarship to Honor Pedro Zamora!

Zamora was an AIDS educator, activist and reality television star. At the age of 22, the HIV-positive gay Latino shared his journey with the virus on MTV’s The Real World 3: San Francisco. The show aired in 1994. The scholarship will honor his contributions 20 years after his passing.

High school seniors and college freshman, sophomores and juniors ages 27 and younger are eligible. They must demonstrate current public service and leadership roles in the HIV/AIDS fight. They also must intend to pursue a career that will have with a clear impact on the epidemic.

Applications are being accepted through Wednesday, October 15. Recipients will be announced Monday, December 1, which is World AIDS Day. Awards range from $2,500 to $5,000.

This year, POZ is celebrating HIV-positive & negative individuals under 30! We’re looking for young, unsung heroes who are making a difference in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Nominate yourself or someone you know.

The early deadline for nominations was August 8, 2014, but we’re still looking!