Rae Lewis Thornton: The Case of Mike Brown

“I have lots more to say about my life and HIV/AIDS for sure, but right now I have lots  to say about the micro topics surrounding the death of Mike Brown and the situation in Ferguson. On Friday, I wanted to tweet my usual #FuckinFriday hashtag focusing on HIV prevention, but was virtually paralyzed.

What could I say to young people about safe sex in a society where their life is not valued? Where right wing, racist trolls are seeking out the hashtag #Ferguson and tweeting that Mike was just another koon?

lgbtqblogs

lgbtqblogs:

The recent release of the much-anticipated film “The Normal Heart,” which follows a gay activist trying to raise awareness in the early years of the AIDS crisis, has sparked a renewed conversation about the disease and what exactly went wrong in the early days of the epidemic.

Phill Wilson, president of the Black AIDS Institute, spoke with HuffPost Live’s Josh Zepps about what was going on in New York City during the outbreak of AIDS. He said that not only did gay men in New York not matter at the time, but this same marginalization still applies today.

"Today, the most at-risk population for HIV are young, black, gay men," Wilson said. "And they are at risk at part because it’s yet another population that just doesn’t matter and it seems, in some ways, we’ve not learned lessons [and instead] we’ve just changed the population that doesn’t matter."

The fight against AIDS is not a thing of the past, but the tools to end the epidemic are available, Wilson said, and the question is whether there is the will and desire to take the steps to actually do so.

POZ Exclusive: Once Is Not EnoughLast year, former professional basketball player and college coach Tamika Williams traveled the world to talk with women and girls about HIV awareness. This year, she simply had to do it again.

"The face of the disease looks like us. I’ve met woman after woman, and girl after girl who had only been with their first partner—the person they lost their virginity to—and contracted HIV. It doesn’t matter how uncomfortable you are, or where you are. You have to able to have confidence enough to protect yourself."

POZ Exclusive: Once Is Not Enough

Last year, former professional basketball player and college coach Tamika Williams traveled the world to talk with women and girls about HIV awareness. This year, she simply had to do it again.

"The face of the disease looks like us. I’ve met woman after woman, and girl after girl who had only been with their first partner—the person they lost their virginity to—and contracted HIV. It doesn’t matter how uncomfortable you are, or where you are. You have to able to have confidence enough to protect yourself."

actgnetwork
actgnetwork:

Our friends at POZ Magazine posted our Underrepresented Populations Committee’s statement about National Black HIV AIDS Awareness Day to their website! Learn about how your zip code could be a risk factor and ways to keep yourself healthy. www.poz.com #actg2014 #hiv #aids #nbhaad #health #science #research #poz http://ift.tt/1ijJX7Y

actgnetwork:

Our friends at POZ Magazine posted our Underrepresented Populations Committee’s statement about National Black HIV AIDS Awareness Day to their website! Learn about how your zip code could be a risk factor and ways to keep yourself healthy. www.poz.com
#actg2014 #hiv #aids #nbhaad #health #science #research #poz http://ift.tt/1ijJX7Y

The Reverend Savalas Squire Sr., an ordained Baptist minister and heterosexual black man, has opened himself and his congregation to a dialogue about God, the church and HIV/AIDS. He preaches against the lack of engagement on the issue among the clergy and their congregations. And like many other African-American faith leaders, he has committed his life and ministry to overcoming HIV stigma and discrimination.

The Reverend Savalas Squire Sr., an ordained Baptist minister and heterosexual black man, has opened himself and his congregation to a dialogue about God, the church and HIV/AIDS. He preaches against the lack of engagement on the issue among the clergy and their congregations. And like many other African-American faith leaders, he has committed his life and ministry to overcoming HIV stigma and discrimination.

Will The Denver Principles Ever Be Relevant To Black People Living With HIV & AIDS?
Larry Bryant blogs about the problems with how the Denver Principles perceived the epidemic at its beginning and how many repeatedly and incorrectly ‘labeled’ the epidemic out of fear and ignorance.
"I still remember the shouts from a few gay white men in south Florida to Black women participating in the same rally for access to care, ‘Go home! Black people have stolen our epidemic!’"

Will The Denver Principles Ever Be Relevant To Black People Living With HIV & AIDS?


Larry Bryant blogs about the problems with how the Denver Principles perceived the epidemic at its beginning and how many repeatedly and incorrectly ‘labeled’ the epidemic out of fear and ignorance.

"I still remember the shouts from a few gay white men in south Florida to Black women participating in the same rally for access to care, ‘Go home! Black people have stolen our epidemic!’"

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day 2011 (Commemorating Reggie Williams)

Monday, February 7th, marks the 11th anniversary of Black AIDS Awareness Day, an annual commemoration that calls upon Black people to take action against HIV and AIDS.

Nobel prize winner Andre Gide once said, “Everything that needs to be said has already been said. But since no one was listening, everything must be said again.” The fact that 30 years into America’s AIDS epidemic, HIV/AIDS continues to rage in Black communities and families, suggests that this thought could apply here. According to a 2009 Kaiser Family Foundation study (pdf), 58 percent of Black Americans know someone with HIV/AIDS, and for 38 percent of us, that “someone” is a close personal friend or family member.

But rather than rehash statistics describing the magnitude of the epidemic and its disproportionate impact on Black women, youth, injection drug users and men who have sex with men, I’d like to ask you to think about the people in your life who are at risk of HIV, who are living with the virus or have already died of AIDS.

This week, I’m thinking about my friend Reggie Williams, who passed away 12 years ago on the date that now marks Black AIDS Awareness Day. I used to call Reggie my “brister”—he was both brother and sister to me. He was the person I went to when I needed to talk about my life without having to explain myself. He didn’t need a glossary to understand my words when I talked about the difficulty of having a partner living with HIV or the challenges of living with HIV myself because my truth was his truth.

Click here to read all of Phill Wilson’s blog.