In his latest blog, Aundaray Guess catches up with a friend who’s been living with HIV for 20 years, ultimately uncovering a shocking, saddening discussion:“He looked at me plainly and shared he was no longer on HIV medication. He reported it wasn’t his choice; he recently became resistant to all available HIV medication, including his own regiment. His doctors informed him he had no immediate options.”

In his latest blog, Aundaray Guess catches up with a friend who’s been living with HIV for 20 years, ultimately uncovering a shocking, saddening discussion:

“He looked at me plainly and shared he was no longer on HIV medication. He reported it wasn’t his choice; he recently became resistant to all available HIV medication, including his own regiment. His doctors informed him he had no immediate options.”

Aundaray Guess: The Grey Invisibles of HIV

When HIV statistics are branded about, a large focus is placed on the young gay community, and justifiably so. But gay seniors are facing the same crisis:

  • According to the CDC, there has been a steady increase in HIV infections in Americans 65 years and older.
  • Annually, about 10-11% of newly diagnosed U.S. HIV cases occur among older adults.
  • That comes out to about 5,000-6,000 new cases of HIV in this age group every single year.

(images: HIV/AIDS Prevention Campaigns for Seniors and Older Adults on the Streets of NYC, Global Action on Aging)

Aundaray Guess: Springing into Love
The arrival of spring means out with the old and in with the new. This is also the season when we’re open for something new in our lives. We’re looking for romance. But how do you find love when you’re HIV positive? It’s a task which can seem insurmountable in any circumstance, and adding the stigmatization of the disease and feeling less valued because of it, makes one often ask; why bother?

Aundaray Guess: Springing into Love

The arrival of spring means out with the old and in with the new. This is also the season when we’re open for something new in our lives. We’re looking for romance.

But how do you find love when you’re HIV positive? It’s a task which can seem insurmountable in any circumstance, and adding the stigmatization of the disease and feeling less valued because of it, makes one often ask; why bother?

Family Secret: In his latest blog, Aundaray Guess writes of his long struggle finding and losing his family’s support after an HIV diagnosis:
"Living with HIV, a person sometimes wants to use it to create that closeness. In my case it was with family…. It has created in me a song that says, ‘I don’t need anyone’…. I still find myself in moments where I feel like an orphan and don’t want to depend on anyone. Having HIV this is a bad idea as we all need support but you can’t help going to that feeling of being a loner after all it is safe and you won’t get hurt…again."

Family Secret: In his latest blog, Aundaray Guess writes of his long struggle finding and losing his family’s support after an HIV diagnosis:

"Living with HIV, a person sometimes wants to use it to create that closeness. In my case it was with family…. It has created in me a song that says, ‘I don’t need anyone’…. I still find myself in moments where I feel like an orphan and don’t want to depend on anyone. Having HIV this is a bad idea as we all need support but you can’t help going to that feeling of being a loner after all it is safe and you won’t get hurt…again."
Life’s Lessons With HIV: As he enters into his 28th year living with HIV, Aundaray Guess reflects on 20 lessons he’s learned being positive in a tough world. Our 5 favorites?1) You’re either living or you’re dying and despite what you heard about HIV, it’s not a death sentence.3) I am beautiful. As simple as that.11) Sex is still good.13) I’m more than HIV.19) Drinking chocolate milk helps the pills go down easy.

Life’s Lessons With HIV: As he enters into his 28th year living with HIV, Aundaray Guess reflects on 20 lessons he’s learned being positive in a tough world. Our 5 favorites?

1) You’re either living or you’re dying and despite what you heard about HIV, it’s not a death sentence.

3) I am beautiful. As simple as that.

11) Sex is still good.

13) I’m more than HIV.

19) Drinking chocolate milk helps the pills go down easy.

Christmas WishIn his latest blog, Aundaray Guess asks Santa for a few meaningful gifts to fight HIV/AIDS:
"This season is supposed to be one of merriment and joy but the sad reality is that it’s a reminder of how individuals don’t have a place at the table. But no one should have to feel alone anytime of the year and no one should have to be shunned because of their status. So while you’re at it if you can bring as many chairs that will fit into your bag for all those who feel they don’t belong and by coming together they can see family isn’t always just your blood relatives but the many people who come together for you."

Christmas Wish

In his latest blog, Aundaray Guess asks Santa for a few meaningful gifts to fight HIV/AIDS:


"This season is supposed to be one of merriment and joy but the sad reality is that it’s a reminder of how individuals don’t have a place at the table. But no one should have to feel alone anytime of the year and no one should have to be shunned because of their status. So while you’re at it if you can bring as many chairs that will fit into your bag for all those who feel they don’t belong and by coming together they can see family isn’t always just your blood relatives but the many people who come together for you."
For his latest POZ blog, Aundaray Guess writes: 

“I rewrote the definitions of ‘what if’ and instead of it ending with a negative conclusion, replacing it with positive outcomes. I had to let go of trying to control the endings and just let it happen and then deal with the ramifications good or bad. And in that moment recognizes it was not the word ‘what if’ that I had issues with but it was the word control. I wanted to be one who decided to reject me. I wanted to control who knew my status…”

For his latest POZ blog, Aundaray Guess writes:

I rewrote the definitions of ‘what if’ and instead of it ending with a negative conclusion, replacing it with positive outcomes. I had to let go of trying to control the endings and just let it happen and then deal with the ramifications good or bad. And in that moment recognizes it was not the word ‘what if’ that I had issues with but it was the word control. I wanted to be one who decided to reject me. I wanted to control who knew my status…”