Congress Pushes Bill To Promote Study of Gender Differences in Medical ResearchWe all know well by now that different diseases, medicines and treatment methods work differently in men and women. So why are the majority of clinical trials and basic research still done on male-only subjects?
(img: New York Times "The Drug Dose Gender Gap")

Congress Pushes Bill To Promote Study of Gender Differences in Medical Research

We all know well by now that different diseases, medicines and treatment methods work differently in men and women. So why are the majority of clinical trials and basic research still done on male-only subjects?

(img: New York Times "The Drug Dose Gender Gap")

Congress Urges HHS to Ease Up Restrictions on Marijuana Research

Currently, marijuana is still listed as a Schedule I substance in the U.S., meaning that scientists have to seek permission from the DEA and get state and local licenses that allow them to possess the drug before testing it. This prevents a vast amount of studies that could, and many argue, should be going into the drug.

With more than 22 states allowing the use of marijuana for medical purposes today, and more than 1 million Americans currently using it as treatment, 30 members of Congress are now pushing for federal policies that would help ramp up research, not roadblock it.

POZ Blogs: Robert Suttle’s AIDSWatch 2014 CoverageAIDSWatch is an annual 2-day event for congressional visits, advocacy training, & networking that prepares attendees from across the U.S. for visits with their representatives in Congress.
Activists go to provide resources, talking points, and answers to questions that Congressional staffers may have about programs related to people living with HIV/AIDS. Want to know how it all went down?

POZ Blogs: Robert Suttle’s AIDSWatch 2014 Coverage

AIDSWatch is an annual 2-day event for congressional visits, advocacy training, & networking that prepares attendees from across the U.S. for visits with their representatives in Congress.

Activists go to provide resources, talking points, and answers to questions that Congressional staffers may have about programs related to people living with HIV/AIDS. Want to know how it all went down?

What Does This “Government Shutdown” Mean for HIV/AIDS Drugs?
Turns out it’s not so good. With Congress locked in a critical battle over fiscal talks, the looming threat of a government shutdown on October 1 (tomorrow!) may spell potential delays in FDA approvals of new drugs, such as Viiv’s Tivicay and Epzicom as well as the Hep C pharma field.

What Does This “Government Shutdown” Mean for HIV/AIDS Drugs?

Turns out it’s not so good. With Congress locked in a critical battle over fiscal talks, the looming threat of a government shutdown on October 1 (tomorrow!) may spell potential delays in FDA approvals of new drugs, such as Viiv’s Tivicay and Epzicom as well as the Hep C pharma field.

Good New From Congress (No kidding, I mean it!) 
Sean Strub: On why the latest amendment to the Defense Bill concerning positive members of the military is a milestone in the effort in combating HIV criminalization.
"What was particularly interesting about the amendment’s passage last night was that it was bi-partisan and, ultimately, not controversial, passing on a voice vote in a block of other non-controversial amendments.”
Click here to for more info.

Good New From Congress (No kidding, I mean it!)


Sean Strub: On why the latest amendment to the Defense Bill concerning positive members of the military is a milestone in the effort in combating HIV criminalization.

"What was particularly interesting about the amendment’s passage last night was that it was bi-partisan and, ultimately, not controversial, passing on a voice vote in a block of other non-controversial amendments.”


Click here to for more info.