POZ Opinion: Reevaluate the FDA Gay Blood Ban
A gay California mayor wants to stop discrimination against gay men who want to donate blood:
"The ban was imposed in 1983 when there were no reliable tests for screening blood for HIV/AIDS. It was also made during a time of mass medical confusion and cultural homophobia associated with HIV/AIDS. The current FDA ban is wildly outdated and perpetuates unfair labels against gay and bisexual men that live on through decades of discrimination."

POZ Opinion: Reevaluate the FDA Gay Blood Ban

A gay California mayor wants to stop discrimination against gay men who want to donate blood:

"The ban was imposed in 1983 when there were no reliable tests for screening blood for HIV/AIDS. It was also made during a time of mass medical confusion and cultural homophobia associated with HIV/AIDS. The current FDA ban is wildly outdated and perpetuates unfair labels against gay and bisexual men that live on through decades of discrimination."

lgbtqblogs

gaywrites:

This is absolutely brilliant. 

For almost 30 years, the FDA has banned men who have sex with men (MSM) from donating blood because of this demographic’s historically high rate of HIV. Screening practices have become far more advanced since that time and ALL donated blood is tested for HIV before being passed on to a patient, and yet the ban remains, presumably because of outdated, discriminatory stereotypes about gay men and HIV/AIDS. 

On July 12, MSM around the country have a chance to prove the FDA wrong — by collectively showing up at blood banks and, when they are denied the chance to donate, proving the FDA’s policy worthless. Here are the details:

All across the country on July 12 from 9am to 5pm PST, gay and bisexual men, (also known as “MSM donors”) can show up to a designated blood donation center where a mobile HIV testing center will be waiting. The men will be tested, and once the test is negative, they can attempt to donate blood. When the men are rejected from giving blood, their HIV test results will be compiled and delivered to the FDA, to show the administration why they should lift their ban.

Words can’t explain how pumped I am for this. If enough people participate, the results wil send a powerful message about the absurdity of this policy. Please, please spread the word and stay tuned for more information. 

FDA Approves First Drug to Treat Diarrhea in People With HIV
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Fulyzaq (crofelemer), the first drug to relieve symptoms of diarrhea that is a side effect of HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs). Intended for use among people with HIV who are taking ARVs and whose diarrhea is not caused by a virus, bacteria or parasite, the drug treats watery diarrhea that is a consequence of electrolyte secretion and water in the gastrointestinal tract.
Read more… http://www.poz.com/articles/fulyzaq_crofelemer_salix_761_23339.shtml

FDA Approves First Drug to Treat Diarrhea in People With HIV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Fulyzaq (crofelemer), the first drug to relieve symptoms of diarrhea that is a side effect of HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs). Intended for use among people with HIV who are taking ARVs and whose diarrhea is not caused by a virus, bacteria or parasite, the drug treats watery diarrhea that is a consequence of electrolyte secretion and water in the gastrointestinal tract.

Read more… http://www.poz.com/articles/fulyzaq_crofelemer_salix_761_23339.shtml

FDA Gives Priority Review of Truvada as PrEP

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted Gilead Sciences’ application to give priority review of Truvada (emtricitabine and tenofovir) as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), according to a Gilead statement. This PrEP is when an HIV-negative person takes a daily dose of Truvada as a means to lower the chance of contracting the virus during sex. The FDA grants fast-track appraisal to drug applicants that demonstrate major advances in treatment or provide a treatment where no adequate or current therapy exists. Approval of the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) will be discussed at the FDA Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee in May. The target review date is June 15. 

First Do No Harm
Research geared toward curing HIV is experiencing a resurgence. With new enthusiasm and increased funding, researchers are beginning to plot new interventions to bombard the virus in unusual ways. The first round of studies is bound to carry serious health risks, however, and many will fail. The big unanswered questions are whether HIV-positive people will volunteer for these trials—and if so, whether the FDA and other regulators will let them. Click here for more.

First Do No Harm

Research geared toward curing HIV is experiencing a resurgence. With new enthusiasm and increased funding, researchers are beginning to plot new interventions to bombard the virus in unusual ways. The first round of studies is bound to carry serious health risks, however, and many will fail. The big unanswered questions are whether HIV-positive people will volunteer for these trials—and if so, whether the FDA and other regulators will let them. Click here for more.