Having lived with HIV/AIDS for 25 years or more, they went through the very worst years of the U.S. epidemic, often outliving multiple loved ones and awaiting their own demise. Now that they’re miraculously middle age, they find that in a post-protease culture both their tremendous losses and their hard-won victories have been (often willfully) forgotten. They’re called “The AIDS Generation”

Having lived with HIV/AIDS for 25 years or more, they went through the very worst years of the U.S. epidemic, often outliving multiple loved ones and awaiting their own demise. Now that they’re miraculously middle age, they find that in a post-protease culture both their tremendous losses and their hard-won victories have been (often willfully) forgotten.

They’re called “The AIDS Generation

Wounded AIDS Warriors Suffering, Dying on Their Own by John Voelcker
The death of Spencer Cox prompts a cofounder of the Medius Institute for Gay Men’s Health to speak out.
The death of notable AIDS activist Spencer Cox last month, at age 44, was a wake-up call — a blaring alarm — that highlighted once again the critical need for mental health programs and studies of the powerful trauma experienced by gay men in their 40s through 70s who’ve lived through the loss and destruction of entire communities due to AIDS.
Read more… http://www.poz.com/articles/john_voelcker_spencer_cox_2676_23351.shtml

Wounded AIDS Warriors Suffering, Dying on Their Own by John Voelcker

The death of Spencer Cox prompts a cofounder of the Medius Institute for Gay Men’s Health to speak out.

The death of notable AIDS activist Spencer Cox last month, at age 44, was a wake-up call — a blaring alarm — that highlighted once again the critical need for mental health programs and studies of the powerful trauma experienced by gay men in their 40s through 70s who’ve lived through the loss and destruction of entire communities due to AIDS.

Read more… http://www.poz.com/articles/john_voelcker_spencer_cox_2676_23351.shtml

The Private War That Killed Spencer Cox
AIDS did not kill Spencer Cox in the first, bloodiest battles of the 1980’s. It spared him that.

The reprieve allowed Spencer’s brilliance as co-founder of the Treatment Action Group (TAG)  to forge new FDA guidelines for drug approval and help make effective HIV medications a reality, saving an untold number of lives. 
Such triumph by a man still in his twenties might have signaled even greater achievements ahead. Instead, Spencer found himself adrift in the same personal crisis as many of his contemporaries, who struggled for a meaningful existence after years of combating the most frightening public health crisis of modern times.
Read more of Mark S. King’s blog: http://blogs.poz.com/marksking/2013/01/the_private_war_that.html

The Private War That Killed Spencer Cox

AIDS did not kill Spencer Cox in the first, bloodiest battles of the 1980’s. It spared him that.

The reprieve allowed Spencer’s brilliance as co-founder of the Treatment Action Group (TAG)  to forge new FDA guidelines for drug approval and help make effective HIV medications a reality, saving an untold number of lives.

Such triumph by a man still in his twenties might have signaled even greater achievements ahead. Instead, Spencer found himself adrift in the same personal crisis as many of his contemporaries, who struggled for a meaningful existence after years of combating the most frightening public health crisis of modern times.

Read more of Mark S. King’s blog: http://blogs.poz.com/marksking/2013/01/the_private_war_that.html

Eye of the Tiger: How To Survive A Plague
Watching the new and highly-acclaimed documentary How To Survive a Plague was very strange for me. I think that’s because the film’s story — the fierce battle against the AIDS epidemic that was fought in the late 1980s and early 90s by AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power (ACT UP) and its offshoot the Treatment Action Group (TAG) — is my story.
http://blogs.poz.com/spencercox/2012/10/how_to_survive_a_plague.html
A blog by Spencer Cox

Eye of the Tiger: How To Survive A Plague

Watching the new and highly-acclaimed documentary How To Survive a Plague was very strange for me. I think that’s because the film’s story — the fierce battle against the AIDS epidemic that was fought in the late 1980s and early 90s by AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power (ACT UP) and its offshoot the Treatment Action Group (TAG) — is my story.

http://blogs.poz.com/spencercox/2012/10/how_to_survive_a_plague.html

A blog by Spencer Cox