Pharmagate: Pharma Groups Conspired to Bolster South African Drug PatentsA leaked email has revealed that South African pharma group IPASA colluded with U.S.-based lobby PhRMA to obtain stronger patent laws for drugs in Africa… a move that could ultimately limit the availability of HIV antiretrovirals in one of the hardest-hit nations in the world. Ugh.

Pharmagate: Pharma Groups Conspired to Bolster South African Drug Patents

A leaked email has revealed that South African pharma group IPASA colluded with U.S.-based lobby PhRMA to obtain stronger patent laws for drugs in Africa… a move that could ultimately limit the availability of HIV antiretrovirals in one of the hardest-hit nations in the world. Ugh.

NOTE TO ROOKIES:

Never forget these two facts: First, you can live a long, healthy life with HIV. Second, learning as much as you can about HIV and getting to know other people who have it are the best defense against sickness. So, what next?

Click here for POZ mag’s HIV/AIDS Basics, including all the science-y stuff, rules of transmission and a complete guide to testing, all in one place.

Many of the countries with the greatest HIV epidemics are now in a sense winning the war against the disease, says the NYT. Explained: If a country begins to put more people on therapy than are newly infected, a crucial “tipping point” is reached. Rwanda, Botswana, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Ethiopia and Haiti, among others have gotten to this point within the last few years, as a result of high impact prevention models in these regions.

Many of the countries with the greatest HIV epidemics are now in a sense winning the war against the disease, says the NYT.

Explained: If a country begins to put more people on therapy than are newly infected, a crucial “tipping point” is reached. Rwanda, Botswana, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Ethiopia and Haiti, among others have gotten to this point within the last few years, as a result of high impact prevention models in these regions.

Newly Found HIV Replication Pathway May Lead to New Drugs
More than 90% of HIV fails to integrate its DNA into human cells, leaving unintegrated viruses the cell. In the past, researchers have assumed that these stranded viruses could not copy themselves. But new research has discovered that some of these DNA cells are able to skip the integration process and still reproduce itself, making new viruses that can in turn infect other cells… which helps HIV survive in the face of most ARV drugs. 
So how will this help us develop better HIV treatment?

Newly Found HIV Replication Pathway May Lead to New Drugs

More than 90% of HIV fails to integrate its DNA into human cells, leaving unintegrated viruses the cell. In the past, researchers have assumed that these stranded viruses could not copy themselves. But new research has discovered that some of these DNA cells are able to skip the integration process and still reproduce itself, making new viruses that can in turn infect other cells… which helps HIV survive in the face of most ARV drugs.

So how will this help us develop better HIV treatment?

The Mark of a Runner: T2+
David Ernesto Munar wears his green TEAM TO END AIDS (T2) wristband every time he runs, marking his membership to a training program that fights HIV/AIDS with endurance sports."With [ARV] therapy, my world changed. I ran my first of many marathons at age 35. I rediscovered running in the leaves of fall and in the deep freeze of winter. Not only did I conquer the pool, I trained for a triathlon in Lake Michigan!"

The Mark of a Runner: T2+


David Ernesto Munar wears his green TEAM TO END AIDS (T2) wristband every time he runs, marking his membership to a training program that fights HIV/AIDS with endurance sports.

"With [ARV] therapy, my world changed. I ran my first of many marathons at age 35. I rediscovered running in the leaves of fall and in the deep freeze of winter. Not only did I conquer the pool, I trained for a triathlon in Lake Michigan!"