Scientists Devise Method of Snipping HIV From Immune Cells… Could Lead to Vaccine, Even Cure“This is one important step on the path toward a permanent cure for [HIV],” study co-lead researcher Kamel Khalili.“It’s an exciting discovery, but it’s not yet ready to go into the clinic. It’s a proof of concept that we’re moving in the right direction,” said study co-lead researcher Wenhui Hu.

Scientists Devise Method of Snipping HIV From Immune Cells… Could Lead to Vaccine, Even Cure

“This is one important step on the path toward a permanent cure for [HIV],” study co-lead researcher Kamel Khalili.

“It’s an exciting discovery, but it’s not yet ready to go into the clinic. It’s a proof of concept that we’re moving in the right direction,” said study co-lead researcher Wenhui Hu.

amfAR’s Best Bets for an HIV CureThese 7 scientists will be leading research teams supported by more than $2M in grants from the Foundation for AIDS Research. If you want to know about the science going behind the virus today, check them out:Ramesh Akkina: Using humanized mice to unmask the HIV reservoir.Nicholas Chomont: Studying HIV persistence in T cells during ARV treatment.Scott Kitchen: Programming T cells to eradicate HIV.Javier Martinez: Replicating the experience of the Berlin patient.Vanderson Rocha: Identifying stem cell donors with CCR5 potential.Robert Siciliano, Guido Silvestri: Shedding light on the need for change in current HIV cure efforts.

amfAR’s Best Bets for an HIV Cure

These 7 scientists will be leading research teams supported by more than $2M in grants from the Foundation for AIDS Research. If you want to know about the science going behind the virus today, check them out:

Ramesh Akkina: Using humanized mice to unmask the HIV reservoir.
Nicholas Chomont: Studying HIV persistence in T cells during ARV treatment.
Scott Kitchen: Programming T cells to eradicate HIV.
Javier Martinez: Replicating the experience of the Berlin patient.
Vanderson Rocha: Identifying stem cell donors with CCR5 potential.
Robert Siciliano, Guido Silvestri: Shedding light on the need for change in current HIV cure efforts.

Today, the Forum HIV Cure Project is holding its first public meeting to address the regulatory, ethical and scientific challenges that are currently facing HIV cure research. More than 100 experts from various fields are meeting up, including: the NIH, amfAR, ViiV, Kaiser, TAG, Project Inform, the Gates Foundation, and an array of U.S. universities.
Click here for more information or here for a live webcast of the event.

Today, the Forum HIV Cure Project is holding its first public meeting to address the regulatory, ethical and scientific challenges that are currently facing HIV cure research.

More than 100 experts from various fields are meeting up, including: the NIH, amfAR, ViiV, Kaiser, TAG, Project Inform, the Gates Foundation, and an array of U.S. universities.

Click here for more information or here for a live webcast of the event.

Real Talk: A Ballooning ReservoirThe viral reservoir, whose stubborn presence is the main reason why attempts to cure HIV with standard antiretrovirals fall flat, may be as much as 60 times larger than scientists once conceived. “We just need a realistic idea of what we’re up against,” says Dr. Robert F. Siciliano. “And for most people, we have to prepare ourselves that we don’t have a way to [cure them] now and it’s going to take a long time to do it.”

Real Talk: A Ballooning Reservoir

The viral reservoir, whose stubborn presence is the main reason why attempts to cure HIV with standard antiretrovirals fall flat, may be as much as 60 times larger than scientists once conceived.

“We just need a realistic idea of what we’re up against,” says Dr. Robert F. Siciliano. “And for most people, we have to prepare ourselves that we don’t have a way to [cure them] now and it’s going to take a long time to do it.”

Coinfected With HIV and Hep C? Time To Party Like It’s 1996The hep C revolution is upon us. Echoing the 1996 introduction of HIV antiretroviral cocktails, 2014 is all but certain to go down in history as HCV’s watershed year. Keep an eye out for Gilead’s ledipasvir and Bristol-Myers Squibb’s daclatasvir. They can be used interferon free and allow for 95%+ cure rates after as little as six to 12 weeks of treatment.

Coinfected With HIV and Hep C? Time To Party Like It’s 1996

The hep C revolution is upon us. Echoing the 1996 introduction of HIV antiretroviral cocktails, 2014 is all but certain to go down in history as HCV’s watershed year. Keep an eye out for Gilead’s ledipasvir and Bristol-Myers Squibb’s daclatasvir. They can be used interferon free and allow for 95%+ cure rates after as little as six to 12 weeks of treatment.