harmreduction

harmreduction:

HOW POLICE CAN ARREST THE SPREAD OF HIV

Across the globe, HIV rates are climbing among sex workers and people who use drugs. One of the main reasons is that they are criminalized. Too often sex workers and drug users are forced to choose between protecting their health and staying safe from police harassment or arrest.

But a novel approach to law enforcement is changing this, and may prove as critical to HIV prevention as a condom or clean needle. Through partnerships with HIV experts and community groups, police from Kenya to Kyrgyzstan are realizing their role in the fight against HIV.

Above, Daniel Wolfe, director of the Open Society International Harm Reduction Development Program, talks about how police are working to implement harm reduction approaches to HIV prevention with these vulnerable populations.

harmreduction

harmreduction:

A few photos from the New York City Support, Don’t Punish, taken outside of UN Headquarters. 

Support. Don’t Punish! is a global advocacy campaign to raise awareness of the harms being caused by the criminalization of people who use drugs. The campaign aims to change laws and policies which impede access to harm reduction interventions, and to promote respect for the human rights of people who use drugs.

The Support. Don’t Punish! campaign aims to:

  • Change laws and policies which impede access to harm reduction interventions for people who use drugs.
  • Raise awareness about the need to stop criminalising (‘punishing’) people for using drugs.
  • Raise awareness about the need for greater funding and attention for essential health services and other ‘support’ for people who use drugs.
  • Promote respect for the human rights of people who use drugs.
  • Engender public support for drug reform.
FDA Approves First Drug to Treat Diarrhea in People With HIV
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Fulyzaq (crofelemer), the first drug to relieve symptoms of diarrhea that is a side effect of HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs). Intended for use among people with HIV who are taking ARVs and whose diarrhea is not caused by a virus, bacteria or parasite, the drug treats watery diarrhea that is a consequence of electrolyte secretion and water in the gastrointestinal tract.
Read more… http://www.poz.com/articles/fulyzaq_crofelemer_salix_761_23339.shtml

FDA Approves First Drug to Treat Diarrhea in People With HIV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Fulyzaq (crofelemer), the first drug to relieve symptoms of diarrhea that is a side effect of HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs). Intended for use among people with HIV who are taking ARVs and whose diarrhea is not caused by a virus, bacteria or parasite, the drug treats watery diarrhea that is a consequence of electrolyte secretion and water in the gastrointestinal tract.

Read more… http://www.poz.com/articles/fulyzaq_crofelemer_salix_761_23339.shtml

jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

A drug widely used to control HIV in infected individuals may have a beneficial side effect. It appears that this drug can also attack Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), the primary cause of cervical cancer.

It’s an interesting finding, because the drug appears to work in an entirely different manner on HPV than it does on HIV. The two viruses are extremely different in their biology. 

This is indeed an interesting study. Click here to read our expanded coverage.

younghealers

younghealers:

This animation explains why people in developing countries can’t get the HIV medicines they need to survive and how setting up a ‘patent pool’ could change that. MSF calls on researchers and pharmaceutical companies: put your patents in the pool!

Interesting ad. This is the first ad I’ve seen that covers the topic of patents and patent pools. It can get complicated. Check out some of our coverage here.