POZ is now seeking nominations for the 2014 POZ 100!


This year, we’re looking for HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals under 30. We want young, unsung heroes who are making a difference in the fight, however they can.


Deadline: August 8th! To apply/nominate, click here, email poz100@poz.com or call Cassidy @ 212-938-2052. If you make it, you’ll be featured in our December 2014 issue.

POZ Opinion: Another Miracle Baby, a Still-Broken SystemTwo Babies “Functionally Cured.” But to put treatment within reach to all pregnant women and newborns, we need to fix our broken healthcare system, and we need reproductive justice:

    •    We need Medicaid expansion in all states, and quality, accessible HIV testing and healthcare for all people (including the undocumented immigrants who are denied many of the promises of Obamacare).    •    We need comprehensive mental health services and trauma-informed care for women and all other  people living with HIV.    •    We need policies and programs to allow women to access perinatal and health services that respect their human rights and that support them as parents, rather than using or threatening punitive measures, and    •    We need to scale up comprehensive and combination HIV prevention strategies so women can protect themselves from HIV before, during and after pregnancy.

POZ Opinion: Another Miracle Baby, a Still-Broken System

Two Babies “Functionally Cured.” But to put treatment within reach to all pregnant women and newborns, we need to fix our broken healthcare system, and we need reproductive justice:


    •    We need Medicaid expansion in all states, and quality, accessible HIV testing and healthcare for all people (including the undocumented immigrants who are denied many of the promises of Obamacare).
    •    We need comprehensive mental health services and trauma-informed care for women and all other  people living with HIV.
    •    We need policies and programs to allow women to access perinatal and health services that respect their human rights and that support them as parents, rather than using or threatening punitive measures, and
    •    We need to scale up comprehensive and combination HIV prevention strategies so women can protect themselves from HIV before, during and after pregnancy.

Michigan GOP Official: People With AIDS Lie to Get Health CareDave Agema: “Folks, they [gay people] want free medical because they’re dying [when they’re] between 30 and 44 years old. To me, it’s a moral issue. It’s a biblical issue. Traditional marriage is where it should be, and it’s in our [national] platform. Those in our party who oppose traditional marriage are wrong.”Blech.

Michigan GOP Official: People With AIDS Lie to Get Health Care

Dave Agema: “Folks, they [gay people] want free medical because they’re dying [when they’re] between 30 and 44 years old. To me, it’s a moral issue. It’s a biblical issue. Traditional marriage is where it should be, and it’s in our [national] platform. Those in our party who oppose traditional marriage are wrong.”

Blech.

U.S. Supreme Court to Hear Challenge to Health Care Reform

The U.S. Supreme Court has announced it will hear a challenge to President Obama’s Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. health care reform). At issue is whether Congress has the power to require people to buy health insurance or face a penalty. The justices will decide if the mandate is constitutional and how much the Affordable Care Act falls within the mandate. They will also consider the law’s expansion of Medicaid. The court will hear oral arguments in March and decide by late June, in the midst of the 2012 presidential campaign. Click here for more.

As the nation’s health care system reels from the economic meltdown and 
the uncertainty of upcoming reforms (including those in the Affordable 
Care Act, scheduled to take full effect in 2014) and possible cuts to Medicaid and Medicare, many people with HIV are wondering about the future health of HIV care in America. But the changing—and fiscally challenged—landscape has produced some new models that point the way to a place of improved care for more people living with HIV.Click here for more.

As the nation’s health care system reels from the economic meltdown and 
the uncertainty of upcoming reforms (including those in the Affordable 
Care Act, scheduled to take full effect in 2014) and possible cuts to Medicaid and Medicare, many people with HIV are wondering about the future health of HIV care in America. But the changing—and fiscally challenged—landscape has produced some new models that point the way to a place of improved care for more people living with HIV.Click here for more.