New York Set to Legalize Medical Marijuana, But With Strict LimitsIn about 18 months, weed will become legal in the Empire state. BUT the government won’t let you smoke it, has limited its use to just 10 serious illnesses and will have the right to revoke the law at any time.Good news though: HIV/AIDS is included in the list of conditions covered.

New York Set to Legalize Medical Marijuana, But With Strict Limits

In about 18 months, weed will become legal in the Empire state. BUT the government won’t let you smoke it, has limited its use to just 10 serious illnesses and will have the right to revoke the law at any time.

Good news though: HIV/AIDS is included in the list of conditions covered.

Congress Urges HHS to Ease Up Restrictions on Marijuana Research

Currently, marijuana is still listed as a Schedule I substance in the U.S., meaning that scientists have to seek permission from the DEA and get state and local licenses that allow them to possess the drug before testing it. This prevents a vast amount of studies that could, and many argue, should be going into the drug.

With more than 22 states allowing the use of marijuana for medical purposes today, and more than 1 million Americans currently using it as treatment, 30 members of Congress are now pushing for federal policies that would help ramp up research, not roadblock it.

Navigating Medical Marijuana in the MainstreamSteph Sherer, the executive director of Americans for Safe Access sets the record straight for pot patients in her latest POZ Opinion piece:
"The facts about medical cannabis are frequently counterintuitive. On the medical side, cannabis stimulates appetite, but those who use it are on average thinner and have less of a chance of getting diabetes… because it helps regulate insulin. The smoke contains tars similar to tobacco, but there is no link to lung cancer among even the heaviest users… because it has a protective effect.  States with medical cannabis laws  have seen teen  marijuana use drop since the laws were enacted and have fewer fatal traffic accidents. Just last week, a study by UT showed the rate of assault and property crimes doesn’t increase when states pass medical cannabis laws; it drops."

Navigating Medical Marijuana in the Mainstream

Steph Sherer, the executive director of Americans for Safe Access sets the record straight for pot patients in her latest POZ Opinion piece:

"The facts about medical cannabis are frequently counterintuitive. On the medical side, cannabis stimulates appetite, but those who use it are on average thinner and have less of a chance of getting diabetes… because it helps regulate insulin. The smoke contains tars similar to tobacco, but there is no link to lung cancer among even the heaviest users… because it has a protective effect.  States with medical cannabis laws  have seen teen  marijuana use drop since the laws were enacted and have fewer fatal traffic accidents. Just last week, a study by UT showed the rate of assault and property crimes doesn’t increase when states pass medical cannabis laws; it drops."
Synthetic Compounds From Marijuana Appear to Fight HIVCannabinoids, which are the primary active compounds in marijuana, bind to proteins called CB2 receptors on the surface of macrophage immune cells. The CB2 site may play a role in reducing inflammation in the central nervous system, which is a major concern for people living with HIV.
To read more, click here.

Synthetic Compounds From Marijuana Appear to Fight HIV
Cannabinoids, which are the primary active compounds in marijuana, bind to proteins called CB2 receptors on the surface of macrophage immune cells. The CB2 site may play a role in reducing inflammation in the central nervous system, which is a major concern for people living with HIV.

To read more, click here.