POZ Q&A: Meet The Jeug’e MasterCelebrity glamour technician Karim Odoms took time from his Paris workload to answer POZ’s questions about his career—and why he’s so outspoken about HIV/AIDS.
"I’ve learned to respect that everyone cannot handle dating someone with HIV, and that is OK. However, I find it funny when you meet guys who say, “It’s cool, no problem,” and then you never hear from them ever again—until you run into them at the AIDS Walk, and they’re like, “Oh I’m here supporting my friend.” *blank stare* LOL."

POZ Q&A: Meet The Jeug’e Master

Celebrity glamour technician Karim Odoms took time from his Paris workload to answer POZ’s questions about his career—and why he’s so outspoken about HIV/AIDS.

"I’ve learned to respect that everyone cannot handle dating someone with HIV, and that is OK. However, I find it funny when you meet guys who say, “It’s cool, no problem,” and then you never hear from them ever again—until you run into them at the AIDS Walk, and they’re like, “Oh I’m here supporting my friend.” *blank stare* LOL."
nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

The Beginning Of The End For HIV?
George Hitchings and Gertrude Elion worked together for 30 years designing new drugs and chemotherapies, including work that lead to the development of AZT, the first major medicine for treating HIV/AIDS.
Now 50 years later, two studies published in the journal Science demonstrate that treating HIV-positive patients with anti-retroviral drugs actually stops the spread of the virus throughout a community — and increases the overall life expectancy.
In other words, getting people on HIV drugs lifts up an entire community and is a promising strategy for wiping out the virus entirely.
NPR’s Jason Beaubien explains what the studies found and why they’re so important for public health.
Image from the Wellcome Library, London
 
 
 

To read more on HIV treatment news, click here.

nprglobalhealth:

The Beginning Of The End For HIV?

George Hitchings and Gertrude Elion worked together for 30 years designing new drugs and chemotherapies, including work that lead to the development of AZT, the first major medicine for treating HIV/AIDS.

Now 50 years later, two studies published in the journal Science demonstrate that treating HIV-positive patients with anti-retroviral drugs actually stops the spread of the virus throughout a community — and increases the overall life expectancy.

In other words, getting people on HIV drugs lifts up an entire community and is a promising strategy for wiping out the virus entirely.

NPR’s Jason Beaubien explains what the studies found and why they’re so important for public health.

Image from the Wellcome Library, London

 

 

 

To read more on HIV treatment news, click here.